Chef Emmanuel Julio: Ushering The Era of Progressive Indonesian Cuisine (Passion, 2017)

Seasoned in rigorous kitchens of five-star hotels from Indonesia to as far as UAE, the Executive Sous Chef Emmanuel Julio from The Dharmawangsa shared us a story about his passion with Indonesian cuisine and his modernist effort to promote it internationally.

Can you share a bit about your career as a chef so far?

Back when I was a boy, my parents used to run a restaurant here in Jakarta and also a catering service. Inspired, I decided to learn more about the world of hospitality during college.

My apprenticeship years in the kitchen started from Regent Hotel and later at Four Seasons in the early 2000s. Since I was only studying general hospitality at Trisakti, I had to start everything from a scratch to become a real chef. Chef Vindex Tengker became my mentor until he resigned from here a few years ago.

After my sixth year at the Regent and Four Seasons, I wanted to seek experience abroad. I was posted in Dubai, again with Four Seasons. After quite some time and together with an Italian chef I used to work with there, he tagged me a long for a pre-opening project at Armani Hotel. After spending five years in Dubai, I finally found my way back home and landed here at The Dharmawangsa.

You have done a considerable length to promote Indonesian cuisine with The Dharmawangsa. Care to share us about it?

It’s all about staying true to the establishment’s concept as a luxurious Indonesian hotel and promoting what we dub as Progressive Indonesian Cuisine. Since the initiative started several years ago, we have done a lot of research and becoming more creative in the way we present it.

It’s a perpetual work in progress but it’s going very well, I have to say. Over the years, we have seen younger generations became more and more enthusiastic with this approach. Not long ago, a Dutch chef specifically came here to study our approach with this modern twist and soon he will be opening a fine-dining Indonesian restaurant back in The Netherlands.

Can you tell us about your recent experience promoting Indonesian cuisine abroad?

Quite recently we were hired to help promoting Indonesian food in Shanghai together with our embassy there. The crowd was particularly enthusiastic and that’s actually beyond our expectations! Dishes such as soto Betawi, sop buntut, and fried rice were all best-sellers. Aside from rendang and gulai ayam, the visitors were also very fond of our gado-gado.

Care to explain what you are cooking today for us?

Today we have the oysters and granita, but we are using daun kemangi instead of fruits for the granita. I also put acar timun underneath it. Also we have prepared you the cured salmon using beetroot and served with tuturuga sauce. I also put tobiko and caviar on top of the salmon.

The next one we have our modern take of gudeg which I pair with foie gras! Quite surprisingly, the sweet and simple seared foie gras really works well with the the whole character of gudeg. Lastly we have the beef tenderloin cooked using sous-vide techniques and served with semur sauce.

What are the challenges so far with this kind of presentation?

Each generation thinks differently about our approach here. Like I said earlier, the younger people are more open with the ideas, but older generation retain their conservative views.

For example rendang, they say it should be served traditionally – “messy and hearty”, if you will. Whereas of course it’s different with progressive presentations. Of course, the classic approach is very important, but we aim to make Indonesian cuisine also visually appealing on international level.


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/emmanuel-julio-ushering-the-era-of-progressive-indonesian-cuisine

Images by: Dwi N. Hadi

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Chef Putri Mumpuni: The Relentless Pursuer of Knowledge (Passion, 2017)

For a 26-year-old chef, perhaps only Putri Mumpuni who has seen a lot of actions introducing Indonesian cuisine around the globe through food diplomatic missions. Recently, Putri shared us her adventures and the relentless pursuit of knowledge, now within the world of pastry.

How was it in the beginning for you, Putri?

It was all started with the decision to enroll myself at a trade school so I could be focusing on hospitality in general. There I knew it right away that I wanted to learn more about cookery. Before graduation, I applied for internship at Hyatt Yogyakarta and worked there for about six months.

That time, higher education was a luxury that my parents cannot afford for me since they also wanted my younger siblings to finish primary schools. After getting myself through several odd jobs, I finally landed a job at Grand Aston Yogyakarta right in the hot kitchen and after some time, I managed also to enroll myself at a local university. Working and studying in-between.

Since I wanted so much also to learn about pastry, I was told to spend the extra hours learning about pastry before the working hours. Of course it was unpaid, but in just about a month, I was finally accepted as one of the crews in the pastry department.

While working with Aston, I was also hired by this French family who lives in Yogyakarta as a private chef. My task was to shop and prepare the meals for them for several times a week so they could spend time dining together as a family.

What was the turning point of your career as an aspiring chef back then?

One time I managed to win gold and bronze medals at Salon Culinaire competition in Jakarta for different categories. Until I met Pak William Wongso for the first time and he motivated me to learn more about Indonesian food, something that I wasn’t very familiar with at that time.

The turning point was actually after I decided to focus competing against other chefs in this television show – Top Chef. I had to abandon my study as well as my job with Aston since I was still in the competition for months. In the end, I was eliminated from the Top 9 but I decided to contact Pak William and he offered me a position at his company.

What was the single most challenging task you ever had so far in your career?

My first ever task from Pak William Wongso was to host an Indonesian gala dinner in the Czech Republic for around 80 to 100 embassy guests and foreign dignitaries. I had to do that all by myself!
He asked me, “Putri, can you handle it?” and I said yes with confidence. We did a lot of preparations and I spent around two weeks there. I had to train the local kitchen staffs to cook Indonesian food with minimum communications, since not many can speak English. Google Translate helped me a lot, much to my surprise!

Finally the one-night Gala Dinner went well. We were also preparing Indonesian a la carte menu at the restaurant for the whole two days afterwards.

Share us also your other endeavors with William Wongso’s team across the world?

Usually we received invitations from Indonesian embassies all over the world to organize Indonesian gala dinners or appreciation dinners. So we brought local ingredients, train the local crews, and host the dinners. So far we have been to Japan, South Korea, The Philippines, Germany, France, Singapore, Malaysia, and United States.

However, food diplomacy can go much further than that. Before going to a certain country, we usually get in touch with the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Tourism, or BEKRAF (Indonesian Agency for Creative Economy) so they could coordinate with local institutions to create programs such as workshops, cooking classes, consultancies, or private dinners.

Can you tell us about your work here with BEAU and your future plans?

My move here was fully motivated again by my curiosity with pastry. It’s like when I first tasted how good the real taste of rustic baguette was when in Paris, I really wanted to know how to to make it. The opportunity came and I was very happy to witness firsthand how good Talita is with pastry and her wonderful efforts she has done for BEAU.

Currently I’m being entrusted with the whole operations in the kitchen and together we have been developing the menu since last year. She has taught me a lot and shared many ideas with me so I can improve from time to time.

My future plan? Well, one day I want to manage an Indonesian restaurant abroad, or even perhaps my own restaurant!


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/putri-mumpuni-the-relentless-pursuer-of-knowledge

Images by: Edwin Pangestu

Krakakoa: The Finest From the Labor of Love (Passion, 2017)

The bean-to-bar movement within the cocoa and coffee industry, or the farm-to-table concept found in gourmet restaurants of today have noble ideas to begin with. After four years in the business; Krakakoa has empowered hundreds of farmers, created a lineup of award-winning artisanal chocolate bars, and is ready to represent the finest from Indonesia.

Sabrina Mustopo knew well that Indonesian cocoa has a lot of potential waiting to be further discovered. Her experience working with governments and international think tanks for agricultural matters brought her to a realization that improving the lives of the farmers will positively affect the cocoa industry and the nation’s economy. As we know it, our country is the third largest cocoa producer in the world but severely lacking when it comes to quality.

Together with her colleague Simon Wright, Kakoa was established in 2013 – which later rebranded as Krakakoa. The aim is to produce high quality Indonesian cocoa beans through sustainable farming methods and direct trade. Initially concentrated with plantations in Lampung; Krakakoa also partners with farmers from Bali, Kalimantan, and Sulawesi.

Krakakoa starts by training the farmers on a two-month program before finally outfitting them with tools, guaranteeing a good buying price, and giving them the freedom to choose whomever they want to sell their cocoa beans to. This bring a sense of motivation and responsibility for the farmers to truly tend their crops, while at the same time improving their livelihood and the whole industry in general.

Today, Krakakoa has a rich lineup of cacao-based products, from the single origins and flavored bars, to cacao nibs, drinking chocolates, and even cacao tea. The highlights from Krakakoa are the award-winning, signature single origin of 70% Sedayu Sumatra and 75% Saludengen Sulawesi bars. Additionally, the internationally recognized Academy of Chocolate from London also awarded their uniquely flavored chocolate bars such as the dark chocolate sea salt & pepper, the dark milk chocolate ginger, and the milk chocolate creamy coffee.

Further pursuing their ideals to showcase quality chocolate from Indonesia for the world; Krakakoa has been partnering with F&B personas and establishments – in addition to displaying their lineups at gourmet retailers in Jakarta, Bali, Bandung, Surabaya, Tangerang, and as far as Singapore.


KRAKAKOA | www.krakakoa.com
Office: Jalan Bangka Raya no. 42A-1, Jakarta | T: +621227707031


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/the-finest-from-the-labor-of-love

Images by: Krakakoa

Seirock-Ya, Restoran Ramen Pertama di Indonesia Yang Mendapatkan Sertifikasi Halal MUI

“RAMEN SEIROCK-YA JEPANG” yang dikelola oleh PT. JOYPACK FOODS INDONESIA telah memperoleh sertifikat HALAL dari LPPOM MUI dan menjadi yang pertama di Indonesia per 13 September 2017.

Adalah sebuah kelaziman bahwa bahan penting dalam pembuatan ramen adalah daging babi. RAMEN SEIROCK-YA JEPANG sebelum hadir di Indonesia telah menciptakan menu khusus agar masyarakat Muslim dapat menikmati ramen tanpa khawatir mengenai adanya bahan-bahan yang tidak halal. Meskipun menu-menunya didesain untuk pasar Indonesia, telah menjadi komitmen Seirock-ya untuk tetap memertahankan rasa otentik Jepang.


RAMEN SEIROCK-YA JEPANG
Website: http://www.seirock-ya.asia

Informasi:
PT. JOYPACK FOODS INDONESIA
Jl. Radio Dalam Raya No.9 RT08 RW02, Gandaria Utara, Kebayoran Baru, Jakarta Selatan 12140

Bahasa Indonesia – PIC: Santy
TEL 0813 1450 0522 | santy@joypack.co.jp
Bahasa Jepang – PIC: JU
TEL +81-90-4676-7683 | ju_boksik@joypack.co.jp

The MICHELIN Guide Bangkok 2018 has arrived!

Michelin is pleased to unveil the first selection for the MICHELIN Guide Bangkok, which features a total of 98 restaurants. This selection highlights how the city embraces international dining without abandoning its own heritage and authentic cuisine – which draws millions of visitors worldwide.

Three restaurants obtain two stars in the MICHELIN Guide Bangkok 2018: Gaggan, where the Chef-owner Gaggan Anand takes Indian cuisine to a level rarely seen, and one that has a truly unique signature. His artful dishes are original and creative, with a wonderful blend of textures, flavours, and delicate spices.

Le Normandie, located in The Mandarin Oriental Hotel, also gains two stars. Opened in 1958, the restaurant offers a sophisticated French cuisine based on superb ingredients, refined techniques, and well executed combinations of flavours and textures. Also awarded two stars, Mezzaluna is perched on the 65th floor of the Lebua Hotel, and the chef and his team deliver European delights with Japanese precision in five- and seven-course set menus.

The first selection of the MICHELIN Guide Bangkok also award 14 restaurants one star, highlighting the quality of local cuisine, as 7 of these one star restaurants offer Thai cuisine prepared by local Thai chefs, like Chim by Siam Wisdom, where the chef revisits traditional Thai recipes to create dishes that strike a balance between the old and the new, and between Thai and foreign influences; Bo.lan; Saneh Jaan, a restaurant offering Thai dishes which are a mix of classics and hard-to-find recipes like kaengranjuan, a hot and spicy soup.

Innovative modern Thai cuisine is also well represented in Bangkok with Sra Bua by Kiin Kiin, where the chef respects traditional Thai flavours and ingredients but transforms them to produce something truly creative and original. Of particular interest, one street food vendor also obtains one star: Jay Fai, where the owner-chef insists on staying at the tiny open kitchen with her homemade charcoal stoves, continuing what her father started 70 years ago, making crab omelettes, crab curries and dry congee.

International cuisine is also recognized in the MICHELIN Guide Bangkok 2018 with establishments awarded one star such as Ginza Sushi Ichi, a sushi restaurant where ingredients are delivered straight from markets in Tokyo every 24 hours, or Sühring, where brothers Mathias and Thomas Sühring deliver their very own style of modern German cooking that is sometimes playful, sometimes classic and always prepared with care. L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon, J’AIME by Jean-Michel Lorrain, Elements and Savelberg, both gain a star in this first selection, with these restaurants serving French contemporary cuisine.

This year’s selection also features a total of 35 restaurants awarded a Bib Gourmand, a distinction as popular with chefs as it is with gourmets, which recognize favorite establishments selected by the
MICHELIN inspectors for their good value for money, as they serve a quality menu for a maximum of THB 1000.

On the ground the inspectors unearthed all kinds of delights: from street food like Baan Yai Phad Thai, one of the best place for Phad Thai, or Guay Tiew Kua Gai Suanmali, a long-standing stir-fried chicken noodle shop, to more traditional restaurants offering local and delicious Thai cuisine.

For example, Jay Oh serves local style seafood and dishes in a very local rustic, casual ambience where long queues are seen every night, and also obtaining a Bib Gourmand, Baannai, located in a beautiful Thai style wooden house with a well decorated garden serving traditional and delicate Thai food, or Soul Food Mahanakorn which serves modern Thai food.

Reflecting the impressive diversity of street food in Bangkok, which is one of the most attractive spots for visitors from around the world, the MICHELIN guide selects a total of 28 street food stalls.

View the full selection of the MICHELIN Guide Bangkok 2018 on the website www.guide.michelin.com in English and Thai.

The selection of the MICHELIN Guide Bangkok 2018 features:
✓ 3 two-stars restaurants
✓ 14 one-star restaurants
✓ 35 Bib Gourmand restaurants

The exciting gastronomic escapades of a foodie journo!

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