Tag Archives: Indonesian

Chef Emmanuel Julio: Ushering The Era of Progressive Indonesian Cuisine (Passion, 2017)

Seasoned in rigorous kitchens of five-star hotels from Indonesia to as far as UAE, the Executive Sous Chef Emmanuel Julio from The Dharmawangsa shared us a story about his passion with Indonesian cuisine and his modernist effort to promote it internationally.

Can you share a bit about your career as a chef so far?

Back when I was a boy, my parents used to run a restaurant here in Jakarta and also a catering service. Inspired, I decided to learn more about the world of hospitality during college.

My apprenticeship years in the kitchen started from Regent Hotel and later at Four Seasons in the early 2000s. Since I was only studying general hospitality at Trisakti, I had to start everything from a scratch to become a real chef. Chef Vindex Tengker became my mentor until he resigned from here a few years ago.

After my sixth year at the Regent and Four Seasons, I wanted to seek experience abroad. I was posted in Dubai, again with Four Seasons. After quite some time and together with an Italian chef I used to work with there, he tagged me a long for a pre-opening project at Armani Hotel. After spending five years in Dubai, I finally found my way back home and landed here at The Dharmawangsa.

You have done a considerable length to promote Indonesian cuisine with The Dharmawangsa. Care to share us about it?

It’s all about staying true to the establishment’s concept as a luxurious Indonesian hotel and promoting what we dub as Progressive Indonesian Cuisine. Since the initiative started several years ago, we have done a lot of research and becoming more creative in the way we present it.

It’s a perpetual work in progress but it’s going very well, I have to say. Over the years, we have seen younger generations became more and more enthusiastic with this approach. Not long ago, a Dutch chef specifically came here to study our approach with this modern twist and soon he will be opening a fine-dining Indonesian restaurant back in The Netherlands.

Can you tell us about your recent experience promoting Indonesian cuisine abroad?

Quite recently we were hired to help promoting Indonesian food in Shanghai together with our embassy there. The crowd was particularly enthusiastic and that’s actually beyond our expectations! Dishes such as soto Betawi, sop buntut, and fried rice were all best-sellers. Aside from rendang and gulai ayam, the visitors were also very fond of our gado-gado.

Care to explain what you are cooking today for us?

Today we have the oysters and granita, but we are using daun kemangi instead of fruits for the granita. I also put acar timun underneath it. Also we have prepared you the cured salmon using beetroot and served with tuturuga sauce. I also put tobiko and caviar on top of the salmon.

The next one we have our modern take of gudeg which I pair with foie gras! Quite surprisingly, the sweet and simple seared foie gras really works well with the the whole character of gudeg. Lastly we have the beef tenderloin cooked using sous-vide techniques and served with semur sauce.

What are the challenges so far with this kind of presentation?

Each generation thinks differently about our approach here. Like I said earlier, the younger people are more open with the ideas, but older generation retain their conservative views.

For example rendang, they say it should be served traditionally – “messy and hearty”, if you will. Whereas of course it’s different with progressive presentations. Of course, the classic approach is very important, but we aim to make Indonesian cuisine also visually appealing on international level.


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/emmanuel-julio-ushering-the-era-of-progressive-indonesian-cuisine

Images by: Dwi N. Hadi

Advertisements

Chef Putri Mumpuni: The Relentless Pursuer of Knowledge (Passion, 2017)

For a 26-year-old chef, perhaps only Putri Mumpuni who has seen a lot of actions introducing Indonesian cuisine around the globe through food diplomatic missions. Recently, Putri shared us her adventures and the relentless pursuit of knowledge, now within the world of pastry.

How was it in the beginning for you, Putri?

It was all started with the decision to enroll myself at a trade school so I could be focusing on hospitality in general. There I knew it right away that I wanted to learn more about cookery. Before graduation, I applied for internship at Hyatt Yogyakarta and worked there for about six months.

That time, higher education was a luxury that my parents cannot afford for me since they also wanted my younger siblings to finish primary schools. After getting myself through several odd jobs, I finally landed a job at Grand Aston Yogyakarta right in the hot kitchen and after some time, I managed also to enroll myself at a local university. Working and studying in-between.

Since I wanted so much also to learn about pastry, I was told to spend the extra hours learning about pastry before the working hours. Of course it was unpaid, but in just about a month, I was finally accepted as one of the crews in the pastry department.

While working with Aston, I was also hired by this French family who lives in Yogyakarta as a private chef. My task was to shop and prepare the meals for them for several times a week so they could spend time dining together as a family.

What was the turning point of your career as an aspiring chef back then?

One time I managed to win gold and bronze medals at Salon Culinaire competition in Jakarta for different categories. Until I met Pak William Wongso for the first time and he motivated me to learn more about Indonesian food, something that I wasn’t very familiar with at that time.

The turning point was actually after I decided to focus competing against other chefs in this television show – Top Chef. I had to abandon my study as well as my job with Aston since I was still in the competition for months. In the end, I was eliminated from the Top 9 but I decided to contact Pak William and he offered me a position at his company.

What was the single most challenging task you ever had so far in your career?

My first ever task from Pak William Wongso was to host an Indonesian gala dinner in the Czech Republic for around 80 to 100 embassy guests and foreign dignitaries. I had to do that all by myself!
He asked me, “Putri, can you handle it?” and I said yes with confidence. We did a lot of preparations and I spent around two weeks there. I had to train the local kitchen staffs to cook Indonesian food with minimum communications, since not many can speak English. Google Translate helped me a lot, much to my surprise!

Finally the one-night Gala Dinner went well. We were also preparing Indonesian a la carte menu at the restaurant for the whole two days afterwards.

Share us also your other endeavors with William Wongso’s team across the world?

Usually we received invitations from Indonesian embassies all over the world to organize Indonesian gala dinners or appreciation dinners. So we brought local ingredients, train the local crews, and host the dinners. So far we have been to Japan, South Korea, The Philippines, Germany, France, Singapore, Malaysia, and United States.

However, food diplomacy can go much further than that. Before going to a certain country, we usually get in touch with the Ministry of Education, Ministry of Tourism, or BEKRAF (Indonesian Agency for Creative Economy) so they could coordinate with local institutions to create programs such as workshops, cooking classes, consultancies, or private dinners.

Can you tell us about your work here with BEAU and your future plans?

My move here was fully motivated again by my curiosity with pastry. It’s like when I first tasted how good the real taste of rustic baguette was when in Paris, I really wanted to know how to to make it. The opportunity came and I was very happy to witness firsthand how good Talita is with pastry and her wonderful efforts she has done for BEAU.

Currently I’m being entrusted with the whole operations in the kitchen and together we have been developing the menu since last year. She has taught me a lot and shared many ideas with me so I can improve from time to time.

My future plan? Well, one day I want to manage an Indonesian restaurant abroad, or even perhaps my own restaurant!


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/putri-mumpuni-the-relentless-pursuer-of-knowledge

Images by: Edwin Pangestu

Recipe: Es Pisang Ijo – by Chef Woro Prabandari (Passion, 2017)

When challenged to create a modern Indonesian take on dessert, Chef Woro showed no signs of hesitation when she chose Southern Sulawesi’s pride and joy – es pisang hijau.

Her contemporary take for this dessert is to create the klepon-based sphere that contains the banana itself. Rather than the usual banana-shaped klepon, she chose the sphere shape as a more elegant approach for the street dessert.

Chef Woro also shaped the bubur sumsum into noodles, creating a nest to put the sphere in place. Additionally, she added dots of sweet frambozen syrup as an important representation of the much-loved syrup from the traditional version. To give the extra crunchiness, there are banana biscuits – crushed and spread all over the plate.


INGREDIENTS

Pisang hijau sphere
150 gram Pisang tanduk, steamed
100 gram Rice flour
50 gram Glutinous rice flour
50 gram Sagoo flour
50 gram Granulated sugar
50 ml Suji leaf extract
50 ml Pandan leaf extract
150 ml Coconut milk

Coconut milk porridge / bubur sum sum
25 gram Rice flour
60 gram Granulated sugar
5 gram Salt
500 ml Coconut milk

Frambozen syrup
100 gram Granulated sugar
50 ml Water
To taste Frambozen essence

METHOD

Pisang hijau sphere:
1. Steam pisang tanduk for 15 to 20 minutes until it becomes smooth. Make into round shapes.
2. Mix well other ingredients and cook until sticky and spherical. Fill it with the round-shaped steamed banana.
3. Steam for additional 15 to 20 minutes. Cool it down and ready to serve.

Bubur sum sum:
1. Mix all ingredients together.
2. Cook until bubbly and cool it down for 5 minutes.
3. Chill first before served.

Frambozen syrup:
1. Bring sugar and water to boil for 10 minutes.
2. Add frambozen essence into it and cool it down.

How to style the dish:
1. On the plate, make the bubur sum sum into pasta shape.
2. With the bubur sum sum as the foundation, put the banana sphere on the top.bi
3. Decorate the dish with frambozen syrup drops. You can decorate it with biscuits to make it crunchy or other garnish if you like.
4. Enjoy!


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/es-pisang-hijau

Images by: Dwi N. Hadi

Chef Woro Prabandari: Aspiring Beyond Loyalty (Passion, 2017)

There’s more to it than just loyalty from the prolific chef Woro Prabandari. For more than two decades now and a title of Executive Pastry Chef at Grand Hyatt Jakarta, the motherly chef shared PASSION the recipe for excellence in career and balancing it with family and pastime.

How did you find out about your passion with pastry?

I think it’s because at one point during my childhood, I started giving a hand to my mother when she’s in the kitchen. For some reason, I had always been keen with baking and we started by making the classic stuff. My mother used to cook for events at my father’s office, so that’s how I became accustomed with the know-hows in the kitchen and became serious at it.

How was the beginning of your love story with Hyatt?

After some time seeing myself really into cooking, my parents decided to enroll me to hospitality school and ever since day one I already focused myself with pastry. Before my graduation, I applied for internship at Hyatt and got accepted. As you can see, the rest is history.

Care to tell us a bit about your career here until you reach this height?

Initially I was assigned as part of the pre-opening team for Grand Hyatt Jakarta and received training at Hyatt Aryaduta. In the early nineties perhaps only a handful of five-star hotels can be found in Jakarta and expatriates were so many back then. However, seeing that only a few women were in professional pastry industry at that time, I decided to prove my mettle and spend the extra hours refining my skills.

I took the opportunity to train also whenever I can with fellow pastry chefs after hour, and the veterans. For example since the beginning of my career there’s Mr Gottfried Schützenberger, Hyatt international pastry legend, and one time I was also tutored by Pierre Hermé himself.

Chef Passion Media

What was the turning point of your career?

Professional competitions. Singapore was hosting 1992 Salon Culinaire and I volunteered to participate in the tournament with a small team. Working in the kitchen requires me at least 12 hours a day and we had to focus only with work. Only then after working hours, the team gathered to spend the extra time for planning and practicing. I usually got home late around midnight and had to be back at work again at 7am the next day!

Our sacrifice was not without reward. We won the gold medal for dessert platter category and I got promoted not long. Apparently the company appreciated the effort!

The following Salon Culinaire competitions were held in Jakarta and I participated again, until finally I was appointed as Pastry Chef back in 1998. Now I’m giving the rein to younger chefs and enjoy tutoring them for competitions.

What are your plans after you retire in the future?

There are so many offers asking me to teach. I’d really like do that in the future!

We heard that you like traveling. Tell us a bit about that.

Traveling is something that I do from time to time with the family. I take pleasure by dedicating myself for the company and rarely take a leave. That’s why I have so many days to spend for holiday!

Recently we went to Bali with the whole family – me, my husband, and our three sons. We prefer visiting beaches and of course, eating. Having a privilege as part of Hyatt family enables me to visit their properties everywhere in the world. Certainly going with the whole family is important to maintain the work-life balance.


Original link:
http://www.passionmedia.co.id/b/woro-prabandari-aspiring-beyond-loyalty

Images by: Dwi N. Hadi

Richeese Factory, More Than Just Fried Chicken (mise en place, Vol 20 – 2017)

Indonesia is no stranger when it comes to American-style fried chicken. The dish is widely considered as the cornerstone of Western cuisine influences for the masses in the country. It dates back to 1979, sparked by the pioneer Kentucky Fried Chicken.

Followed suit by McDonald’s in 1991, the country has seen the ups and downs of Western-style fast food industry from both foreign and local brands. Fried chicken however, has solely been very successful in gaining immense influence over Indonesian palate over the years that it has driven most of the brands to actually adapt and develop their own formula of the dish.

Even on this day, decades apart since its first inception; crispy fried chicken can commonly be found on street carts in residential neighborhoods – both privately owned or franchised. Some brands aim for presence at shopping malls, while others are also confident in presenting themselves as standalone restaurants.

Fried chicken is known not just for its delicious, crispy skin and flavorful meat which was previously marinated with spices; Indonesia also has seen creative innovations applied on the original recipe. The local rising star Richeese Factory has its own uniqueness regarding this.

But quite curiously, Richeese Factory was not a fast food chain to begin with. It was originally, and still, a business unit owned by Nabati Group known for its cheese-based snacks, crackers and wafers branded also as “Richeese”. Back in 2011, the group opened its first outlet in Bandung and Richeese Factory is among the few who are confident enough with opening both at shopping malls and as standalone restaurants.

Aside from Jakarta and its neighboring satellite cities, Richeese Factory has expanded as well to Semarang, Solo, Malang, Surabaya, and heading east to Bali. It’s also pioneering its presence to smaller cities like Garut, Cirebon, and Tegal. Yogyakarta would be the next city to anticipate a new opening towards the end of 2017.

From the menu, Richeese Factory cleverly took the advantage of Indonesian people curiosity and palate that fancies the spicier side of food in general. With addition to the use of cheese sauce which differentiates Richeese Factory than the rest of the competition, it also provides several degrees of spiciness that customers can choose for their fried chicken treats.

With 60 outlets in its possession now, Richeese Factory employs a highly standardized operating procedure that will ensure consistency from production and down to the frontline and QC. Periodically, reviews are conducted and socialized to every single crewmember, with the addition of strict audit from the HQ.

The headquarters also devises a system that ensures the logistics efficiency, especially to suit the company’s expansionist strategy. Richeese Factory, as we know it, will open their first outlets outside of Java in Makassar and Balikpapan later this year.


RICHEESE FACTORY | www.richeesefactory.com


Images by: Richeese Factory

This is the unedited version of the article