Tag Archives: Coffee Experts

Coffee Talk With Sagaleh

Meet Dhydha Maryudha – one of the co-owners of Sagaleh, among the first coffee shops that pioneered the emergence of es kopi susu beverage. With the industry landscape is now much more diversified, he shares his two cents about the business.

In just mere three years, coffee shops are sprouting like wildfire across Indonesia. Early last decade, it was all initiated by a handful of third-wave coffee shops, championing both local beans and micro batches from across the globe. The movement sparked a renewed nationwide appreciation toward coffee and the dynamics that surround it.

Among which is something that’s exclusively found in Indonesia and it’s none other than es kopi susu. This is a refreshing mixture of espresso shots with milk and mixed with homemade sugar sauce, with many prefer using brown sugar. Sagaleh however has its own recipe and was among the pioneers alongside Toko Kopi Tuku, Kopi Sana, Animo, and Di Bawah Tangga.

How it all began

Before fully inheriting RM Sepakat – a long standing Padang restaurant in Blok M, Dhydha and the rest of third generation owners decided to open their own business first. As to why a coffee business, he simply says that’s because everyone in the family likes coffee!

I remembered a day in 2017 when I walked down this downhill alley around Petogogan, South Jakarta. There I found Sagaleh and it was not the coffee shop that I would had imagined. It was a home, designed for takeaway orders. There were also stools reserved mostly for Gojek drivers. That was my first time enjoying their bold and indulging es kopi susu. It’s among my personal favorites and tastes consistently the same today.

Sagaleh started out modestly without investing in professional espresso coffee machine. “Four portable stoves and ten moka pots. That’s what it takes to brew our coffee”, Dhydha reminisces. Those days, Gojek was not yet available as easily as today. How they did it was just by letting everyone know that they’re open for business through social media. “We still received last order the day before delivery. The next day, we’re using GoSend to deliver our beverages – even to as far as Tangerang and Cibubur!”, he adds.

However, it wasn’t long until they can finally harness the full might of Gojek to catapult the Sagaleh into a well-known powerhouse in es kopi susu business.

Growth and expansions

A few months later, Sagaleh received an opportunity to expand. With overflowing orders keep on coming, the owners must consider an option to move out and not intruding their residential neighbors furthermore. Since then, a small shop tucked on Jalan Sambas – Blok M, became their new home. It was not only designed for takeaway orders, but also for hanging out.

However, the big break came almost just a year after they first started the business and this time the offer came from Pondok Indah Mall. It was still rare in 2018 to find an es kopi susu vendor in shopping malls. Until this day, the one at Pondok Indah Mall remains among the best performing of all Sagaleh outlets.

In 2019, Sagaleh opened up their flagship store in Panglima Polim area. Designated as a hub, Rumah Sagaleh shares its space with a barber shop. Inside, you can find more seats and even outdoor space. The kitchen was also set up to cater more more food menu to complement your drinks.

“Finally, we have a complete portfolio for Sagaleh. A full-fledged coffee shop, a smaller shop like the one on Jalan Sambas, and a tenant at a lifestyle shopping mall”, explains Dhydha.

The road ahead


Now there are more than just the three outlets in Jakarta. Only recently, they have expanded to Bandung and soon at least a couple more will be opened. “We are also considering for other cities as well. Would be great to reach 10 shops this 2020!”, exclaims Dhydha, brimming with confidence.

Even so, the pathway that Sagaleh leads to is to grow organically. With rapid expansions of several brands in the coffee shop business recently, it was only natural for us to ask his two cents about it. “Do you think such growth is deemed healthy for the industry and the competition?”, we ask.

Wisely Dhydha answers that he does not worry about it. “As long as we can all compete healthily, it should be okay. But my concern would be the astronomical demands for the farmers”, he continues. A just concern, remembering that Indonesian farmers capacity to cater such scale is being seriously challenged.

“Venture capitalists are now partnering with coffee shops and they now have serious KPI to fulfill. Such offer was once presented for us, but we decided to just grow the business by ourselves”, explains Dhydha. The new direction from the management of Sagaleh is not only expanding their business gradually, but to also focusing on quality without forgetting their roots.

“To bridge the gap between es kopi susu and specialty coffee would be where we’re heading next. It’s already challenging to maintain consistency with the products and our human resources. So in the end, it’s all about creating a sustainable business for the long run”, he says.

This article was published in Passion Magazine



RUMAH SAGALEH

Address:
Ruko Dharmawangsa Square, Jl. Darmawangsa VI No.20, RT.5/RW.1, Pulo, Kec. Kby. Baru, Kota Jakarta Selatan, Daerah Khusus Ibukota Jakarta 12160Plaza Senayan, LG Sogo, Jl. Asia Afrika No.8, Senayan, Jakarta

Opening hours:
Daily, 8am-10pm

https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d3966.1214030524197!2d106.80004931439197!3d-6.2477289954776065!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x2e69f1477028ac93%3A0x6a15e14125dd244a!2sRumah%20Sagaleh!5e0!3m2!1sen!2sid!4v1604072609741!5m2!1sen!2sid

Cover Feature: Wajan Roasting with Adi Taroepratjeka (The Foodie Magazine, Mar 2015)

Follow us, dear readers, as we paid a visit to the dwelling of Adi “Peminum Kopi” Taroepratjeka’s and see how he shares his tips and tricks for getting it down and dirty with coffee.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 3 (16)

The first thing first that came out in our plan to work this delicate coffee issue was to work with this man of many talents. Public knows him as a local TV show host who travels around in search for our coffee roots, straight to the plantations in rural Indonesia.

For those who knew already Adi Taroepratjeka before that, he’s already the right guy to ask about practically everything. Years of ups and downs, he had gone through as both businessman and consultant. Even as we speak of him now, he’s currently preparing himself to become Coffee Quality Institute’s certified instructor. It would be an important addition to the Q Grader qualification he already had in his possession.

CQI’s instructor degree itself is a prestigious achievement where only a handful of people in the whole world have gone to the length to accomplish that. He hopes to contribute more for the Indonesian coffee world, so he said, but always in avoidance with the talk about the credit he should receive as an important persona in Indonesian coffee world so far. He’s just naturally humble.

To the envy of many, he has been doing this for quite some time now with her lovely wife who happens to be a certified coffee expert as well, Mia Laksmi. That’s why we decided to pay the couple a visit at his apartment to play some games about coffee, to talk about it, and to enjoy the hallowed drink together.

In this feature, Adi will show you how to conduct a simplified but proper coffee cupping session, a practical comparative study on pseudo espresso versus espresso from the real machine, and lastly – home roasting with a wajan!

Home roasting

Home roasting is common for some small coffee merchants or local coffee shops. By that, there are those who roast the beans traditionally at home. We can also do the same at home with only a minimum requirement of tools.

Here are the basic rules about roasting at home:

1. Prepare a wok, an ergonomic spatula, a portable stove, and a fan (plus a vacuum cleaner, if needed). Please do the roasting on your backyard or your wife will get mad at you with all the fussy chaffs that dirty the kitchen.

2. Buy some good green beans (unroasted beans).

3. Heat the pan up to 300C.

4. Once ready, reduce the heat and pour all the beans in.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 3 (2)

5. Don’t stop whisking until finish. Start to heat up the pan again until the color of the beans start to change into light brown (or light cinnamon color, said Adi)

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6. The beans will soon release the heat and give away the popping sound. Reduce the heat and start fanning the beans to separate the chaffs.

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7. The roasting process should take between 12 – 20 minutes. Keep on whisking until your desired level of color.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 3 (8) Adi Taroepratjeka Part 3 (9) Adi Taroepratjeka Part 3 (10) Adi Taroepratjeka Part 3 (11)

8. Once done, move the beans to another pan or a tampah (bamboo basket to clean the rice) and start shaking it to really release the chaffs thoroughly.

9. Rest for around 24 hours, preferably inside a valved sack.

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10. Get ready to grind and brew!

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE March 2015 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photography by Dennie Ramon

Cover Feature: Pseudo Espresso vs The Machine with Adi Taroepratjeka (The Foodie Magazine, Mar 2015)

Follow us, dear readers, as we paid a visit to the dwelling of Adi “Peminum Kopi” Taroepratjeka’s and see how he shares his tips and tricks for getting it down and dirty with coffee.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 2 (22)

The first thing first that came out in our plan to work this delicate coffee issue was to work with this man of many talents. Public knows him as a local TV show host who travels around in search for our coffee roots, straight to the plantations in rural Indonesia.

For those who knew already Adi Taroepratjeka before that, he’s already the right guy to ask about practically everything. Years of ups and downs, he had gone through as both businessman and consultant. Even as we speak of him now, he’s currently preparing himself to become Coffee Quality Institute’s certified instructor. It would be an important addition to the Q Grader qualification he already had in his possession.

CQI’s instructor degree itself is a prestigious achievement where only a handful of people in the whole world have gone to the length to accomplish that. He hopes to contribute more for the Indonesian coffee world, so he said, but always in avoidance with the talk about the credit he should receive as an important persona in Indonesian coffee world so far. He’s just naturally humble.

To the envy of many, he has been doing this for quite some time now with her lovely wife who happens to be a certified coffee expert as well, Mia Laksmi. That’s why we decided to pay the couple a visit at his apartment to play some games about coffee, to talk about it, and to enjoy the hallowed drink together.

In this feature, Adi will show you how to conduct a simplified but proper coffee cupping session, a practical comparative study on pseudo espresso versus espresso from the real machine, and lastly – home roasting with a wajan!

Pseudo espresso versus the machine

In his apartment, our Peminum Kopi has a formidable one group Expobar Office Control espresso machine. So how about if we have our much needed dose of espresso by pulling a shot with a more affordable choice?

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To challenge the machine, we tested the manual machinations – Presso and Aeropress. At the end of the day, it’s entirely up to us when it comes to our coffee preference, but with this test, we would like to see the edge of each gadget in pulling out a good shot of espresso.

The espresso rule is a complicated one. The requirement starts from preparing finely ground coffee at around 7-10 grams per shot, brewed with a machine that can deliver a pressure of 9 BAR by using 20 – 30ml of 90C – 95C water in 20 – 30 seconds of extraction. The 9 BAR pressure itself can only be achieved with good espresso machine, which means that it’s something incomparable with either Presso or Aeropress.

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That day we concluded that both Presso and Aeropress may not yet be able to reach the complexity found from an espresso extracted by a real machine. Presso can quite reach the desirable thickness of a real espresso and Aeropress produced a lighter bodied coffee with plenty of characters that still remained. For functionality, the latter has the upper hand because not only that it’s portable but can also be easily cleaned.

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For traveling, Adi usually brings his Aeropress, a portable water heater, ceramic blade hand grinder, and a small batch of fresh coffee beans.

Now you know what to invest at an entry level.

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TO BE CONTINUED

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE March 2015 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photography by Dennie Ramon

Cover Feature: Coffee Cupping with Adi Taroepratjeka (The Foodie Magazine, Mar 2015)

Follow us, dear readers, as we paid a visit to the dwelling of Adi “Peminum Kopi” Taroepratjeka’s and see how he shares his tips and tricks for getting it down and dirty with coffee.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 1 (1)

The first thing first that came out in our plan to work this delicate coffee issue was to work with this man of many talents. Public knows him as a local TV show host who travels around in search for our coffee roots, straight to the plantations in rural Indonesia.

For those who knew already Adi Taroepratjeka before that, he’s already the right guy to ask about practically everything. Years of ups and downs, he had gone through as both businessman and consultant. Even as we speak of him now, he’s currently preparing himself to become Coffee Quality Institute’s certified instructor. It would be an important addition to the Q Grader qualification he already had in his possession.

CQI’s instructor degree itself is a prestigious achievement where only a handful of people in the whole world have gone to the length to accomplish that. He hopes to contribute more for the Indonesian coffee world, so he said, but always in avoidance with the talk about the credit he should receive as an important persona in Indonesian coffee world so far. He’s just naturally humble.

To the envy of many, he has been doing this for quite some time now with her lovely wife who happens to be a certified coffee expert as well, Mia Laksmi. That’s why we decided to pay the couple a visit at his apartment to play some games about coffee, to talk about it, and to enjoy the hallowed drink together.

In this feature, Adi will show you how to conduct a simplified but proper coffee cupping session, a practical comparative study on pseudo espresso versus espresso from the real machine, and lastly – home roasting with a wajan!

Coffee cupping

When it comes to cupping, Adi posed a question for us all first.

“Are you sure you want to do this at home? Cupping requires good measurement, a lot of resources, and pile of cups that you need to wash afterwards!” his merry laughter quickly echoed around the apartment.

Coffee cupping itself is a vital process to direct how a coffee company would like to profile its product for the market. Therefore, the initial roasting process itself has to set the coffee at a “neutral” level where the Master Tasters can determine what to do with the potentials and the weakness alike.

At the very least, we can always do the cupping at home with these steps while discounting the prerequisite roasting process. Let’s save that thing for pros for now because the purpose is the education itself. Who knows that this might inspire you to reach the next level with coffee, right?

If you are keen, you can always download the score sheet from Specialty Coffee Association of America’s website and study each category by yourself or under the guidance of an expert.

Without further due, here are some basic things that you have to prepare and the steps on how to do it:

1. Prepare some roasted beans, preferably medium to dark roast so that there will be a lot of characters to explore.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 1 (2)

2. Prepare five cups of equal size. Measure correctly the amount of coffee needed for each cup with a small electronic scale. The optimum ratio is 8.25 grams of coffee beans per 150 ml of water.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 1 (3)

3. Boil the water up to 92C – 95C. Be sure to use mineral water since the minerals will push out the essential oils from the coffee during the brewing and bringing out its potentials.

4. Use the commercial hand coffee grinder for one cup at a time. Don’t grind it too finely. Make it a bit coarse.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 1 (4)

5. Before brewing it, sniff the dry aroma and grade the fragrance level.

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6. Set the timer for about 4 minutes and brew the coffee in whirling motion so that it will mix well.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 1 (7)

7. After four minutes, start to remove the upper crust with a spoon and study the fragrance (sniff deeply the break/wet aroma).

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8. Loudly slurp each cup one at a time. Start to score the flavor and the after taste.

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9. Wait for a while until the temperature drops to around 67C.

10. At this temperature, it will be easier for our tongue to score the remaining categories such as the acidity, sweetness, body, and balance. Uniformity and clean cup categories are to be filled as well at this point.

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11. Lastly, you can always put your own subjective judgment in the Overall category and then add the total score.

Adi Taroepratjeka Part 1 (6)

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TO BE CONTINUED

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE March 2015 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photography by Dennie Ramon

Stuff of Legends: Widyapratama (The Foodie Magazine, Mar 2015)

Finally, our trail to seek good coffee led us to meet Widyapratama, a philosopher and a master roaster behind the success of Kopi Aroma.

Kopi Aroma (2)

The antiquated marble sign says “Aroma – Paberik Kopi”. Even without the knowledge of Kopi Aroma’s historic stature, we will all be convinced that it came from decades ago.

Take a look at the archaic art deco font. It was a sight you will rarely encounter anymore in this country. On the bottom of it, the word “paberik” signified that it came from old Indonesian spelling.

The marble sign, which was quite recently renewed, made everything looked charming again despite Kopi Aroma’s decaying exterior paintwork. It was enough to convey Kopi Aroma’s authority as an 85 year old coffee roaster, the darling of Bandung coffee lovers with a nationwide reputation.

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The roaster survives and flourishes throughout years of competition and tribulation under the adept hands of its owners. Now it is running in full capacity under the leadership of Mr Widyapratama as the second generation owner.

Business seemed good with the long queue of caffeine lovers waiting for their share of good coffee out front. They each were waiting for Kopi Aroma’s coffee-filled retro-look paper bags with old Bahasa inscriptions on it with an instruction for customers on how to store the coffee well. These wonderful white bags have also apparently reached the shores of famous supermarkets outside of Bandung.

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After being escorted by one of his daughters, Pak Widya fetched us right at the entrance of his warehouse. He greeted us and appeared relaxed in his brown safari shirt, the same uniform like everybody who works here. In contrast with his stout-looking workers, Pak Widya is a man in his 60s with a scrawny figure but has this wide, honest smile that emits good health and high spirit.

He’s not only an experienced coffee roaster, but also a lecturer for Padjadjaran University and an active board member of a renowned school in Bandung. “Morning is for work and nighttime is for sleeping. Don’t do the opposite like youngsters nowadays”, he said as a man who spends every day since very early until evening as a business owner and a teacher.

Kopi Aroma (7)

It’s a delightful experience to see a roaster’s playground. There are old machineries that you will rarely see anymore nowadays. Sacks and sacks of coffee beans came from farmers of all over Indonesia were stored after dried for weeks on the farms and hours here.

“We aged the Arabica beans for a full eight years time and Robusta for five years before we roast it. It’s all based on the experience that my late father taught me”, he said.

For Kopi Aroma, this method becomes the way to standardize its coffee beans and to deliver the best result for the customers. The best gimmick of all of Kopi Aroma’s workflow is the use of German’s Probat drum roasters which are still fueled by firewood. It’s their pride and joy since the day it began its business in 1930.

“We use only the sustainable wood from rubber plants and the roasting process takes around two hours. The heat has to be maintained by using five to six small blocks of woods and all you have to do is to wait until the beans start to give away the popping sound”, said Pak Widya scientifically.

Kopi Aroma (8)

Seeing our curiosity, Pak Widya couldn’t help but to tease us, “You might not want to become a writer forever, learn from me on how to become a coffee businessman!”. As a lecturer in entrepreneurship, he swayed us with his tales of success and the discipline that he maintains while at it. Interesting, but it’s not an easy path to choose.

“My father saved up some money while apprenticing to a Dutch coffee businessman so he can finally open up Kopi Aroma. He had since taught me on how to run the business in details and that I should not derail out of the consistency if I want to continue this business forever”, he continued.

To continue his father’s legacy, he treads an ascetic way of life for decades now but still leading a harmonious, balanced life where he could also become a philanthropist. That surely came from experience with willingness to tread this path wholeheartedly.

“What is the use of working only for worldly achievements? We have to save up for our afterlife as well. God is our witness”, he said sternly of his beliefs.

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We then passed through the front sales counter where Pak Widya’s family and staffs were busy packing the coffee in small batches and weighing them one by one to cater the customers’ specific orders. It is said that to ensure the quality, Kopi Aroma will advise its customers to buy in small quantity first and then to return again some other time after they finished their last batch.

As it turns out, we shared so much in common from how we once attended the same school in Bandung until the point where I revealed that my great grandfather used to own the convenient store right across Kopi Aroma. He was surprised but happy to hear that.

“Your great grandfather was a good man. He and my father used to sit on the porch and drink the coffee together every afternoon. Their friendship was genuine, unlike people nowadays”, he reminisced.

I was touched. Hearing the story about my great grandfather, whom I never had the chance to meet in all my life from somebody who is not your family was a proud moment for me.

That’s why with people like Pak Widya, the history can be preserved well. His late father Mr Tan Houw Sian and Pak Widya himself are those who put the extra effort to make our coffee world at this level now.

Even with all what’s happening outside, Kopi Aroma is timeless, but will always be considered highly as one of the pioneers. It has always been walking its pace slowly but for sure, no one will forget its legacy.

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KOPI AROMA

Address:
Jalan Banceuy no. 51, Bandung – Indonesia

T: +62.22.423.0473

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE March 2015 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photography by Dennie Ramon