Cover Feature: Simple Sharing (at Nasi Gule Bu Ati) (The Foodie Magazine, Feb 2014)

Too often I see this specific nasi gule hawker loaded with construction workers and cab drivers during lunchtime. Once I only had the chance for a takeaway of gorengan (fritters) from the neighboring hawker, but the very view of it got crowded intrigued me. People say that if a certain hawker is crowded by cab drivers then it’s either between good, cheap, or just merely strategic. Well, I decided to give it a try for myself.

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Bu Ati as the owner is a cheerful person and served me with a plate full of rice, kerupuk, and a separate bowl of gulai sapi (beef red curry soup). After the first bite, the taste was actually okay but it’s good that the serving was rather generous, which is exactly what most Indonesians look forward to their lunch regardless the taste sometimes.

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Just a squeeze of lime and sweet soy sauce or extra salt or sambal, if you want to enhance the flavor of your liking, then off you go to enjoy the rather spicy curry with diced tendons and beef. It’s always nice to discover a place that is not as commonly known. Who knows it would be a unique place to bring someone special one day.

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NASI GULE BU ATI
Halal-friendly
Unsuitable for vegetarians

Address: On the edge of Jalan Sriwijaya Raya before Jalan Senopati, Jakarta – Indonesia

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE February 2014 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photos by: Dennie Benedict

Cover Feature: Romantic Garden Dinner (at Ayam & Bebek Tangkap Atjeh Rayeuk) (The Foodie Magazine, Feb 2014)

Romance is in the air. During this season of love, you do not have to spend a wadful of cash to express your feelings to your significant other. Remaining true to our objectives here at The Foodie Magazine, we want to give you dining options, at whatever level you would want to be.

Our search for a romantic warung took us to Ayam & Bebek Tangkap Atjeh Rayeuk. Conveniently located, open air and surrounded by greenery, it is a great venue for a romantic date.

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Do you remember the time when there was an invasion of mie Aceh in Jakarta a few years ago? People became rather obsessed with it, and almost every corner had a mie Aceh warung or restaurant. Don’t get me wrong, it is indeed a dish to be reckoned with, but the message Astrid Enricka, owner of Atjeh Rayeuk wants to convey is that patrons should also enjoy other Aceh dishes such as ayam and bebek tangkap.

Bebek Tangkap
Bebek Tangkap

Tangkap is basically a dish which consists of moderate cuts of chicken or duck, already marinated, and then fried. Various leaves, herbs, and spices are put into the frying pan with the chicken or duck, thus giving them more flavor and imparting a captivating aroma. These leaves put into the dish include curry leaves (daun temurui) and pandan leaves. The other unique thing is that these leaves will be served together with the chicken or duck. This will create a somewhat ‘bushy’ presentation with so many leaves hiding the chicken inside, making it totally unique.

We guaranteed a craving madness once you tried it. Not only that the chicken retains a delicious, strong flavor but then came a colorful crunchiness from the leaves. Don’t forget to also color every bit of your bite with Atjeh Rayeuk’s sambals from mango sambal, torch ginger sambal, and even the spicy and sour ‘ganja’ sambal.

Mie Aceh
Mie Aceh

If that’s not enough then do opt to have the mie Aceh as well and share the two wonders with your loved ones and cheers upon a glass of cucumber juice or teh tarik. It’s fun to be romantic this way!

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AYAM & BEBEK TANGKAP ATJEH RAYEUK
Halal-friendly
Unsuitable for vegetarians

Address: Jalan Ciranjang no. 38, Jakarta – Indonesia
Tel: +62.8788.4848.892

Twitter: @AyamTangkapAR

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE February 2014 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photos by: Dennie Benedict

Pantry 101: The Spice of Life (The Foodie Magazine, Feb 2014)

To spice up the love month, we have decided to feature the spice of life and Indonesia’s most favorite vegetable, the chili. Red and green chilies or peppers have long been considered to give an extra kick to boost both the flavor and the eater’s mood for centuries. Here we feature some of the famous chilies along with their Scoville scale ratings that determine their heat level.

bellpepper

Bell pepper
Scofield Scale: 0 (none)

Who doesn’t love these wonderful fruits available in so many colors? The bell peppers are not only rich with nutrients but also possess that crunchy texture and sweetness that we all love to have in our dishes. The red bell pepper is simply the best you can get and is the most mature yet more nutritious among its yellow or green counterparts. Recent studies show that it has over than 30 different members of carotenoid nutrients and vitamins.

Peperoncini

Peperoncini
Scofield Scale: 0 – 500 (mild)

Considered as one of the wonders brought to Europe during early colonization era in South America, peperoncini has since become popularly used in rustic Italian dishes or for instance the famous spaghetti aglio olio e peperoncino. Its mild heat level and sweet note are often used to lend more flavors in antipasti, pizza, or salad and sandwich.

Jalapeno

Jalapeño
Scofield Scale: 2,500 – 10,000 (medium)

Easily the famous pepper found in American and Mexican cuisines. Referred to as huachinango in Mexico, the pepper naturally develops scars in form of small brown lines and the more scars the more heat level for you to expect. Aside from famously made into chipotle (smoked jalapeño), it is often made into juice – believed to be a remedy for allergies and cardiovascular problems.

Serrano

Serrano
Scofield Scale: 10,000 – 25,000 (hot)

Native to mountainous regions of Mexico, these small peppers transform to red color as they mature. Serrano is often used in sauces, marinades, or salsas, and considered as the hotter substitute for jalapeño. A rule of thumb, the smaller the size then the hotter it gets. Just sharing a personal experience here – the dried version is also viciously spicy.

Bird's eye chili

Bird’s eye chili
Scofield Scale: 50,000 – 100,000 (very hot)

Undisputedly, it is the pride of Southeast Asians and especially here in Indonesia where it is named as cabe rawit. While it may appear small and harmless but make no mistake, it packs a knockout punch for those who are not used to it. Cabe rawit is applied in many recipes here from simple fritters (or gorengan) to even more sophisticated dishes.

Habanero

Habanero
Scofield Scale: 100,000 – 350,000 (exceptionally hot)

Undisputedly one of the hottest chili among the naturally bred for commercial use, habanero is a native Mexican and commonly used as an accompaniment in salsa as it possessed also the fruity and floral aromas, making it less notorious somehow. Aside from the heat, it boasts also nutritional values. Even so, you might want to think again before bracing yourself with its KO punch.

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE February 2014 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

 

Taking It To The Streets: Sate Padang Ajo Ramon (The Foodie Magazine, Feb 2014)

Nasi goreng may rule the streets at night among the oh-so-many options for dinner. However, at times we often forget that there’s also a hero well-loved by everyone aside from soto, pecel, or porridge. Yes, there’s none other than a plate of tangy and flavorful sate padang for dinner and came from one of the famous versions comes from Sate Padang Ajo Ramon.

As we all know, the usual satays in Indonesia, such as sate ayam or sate kambing, use mostly the meat part and served with peanut sauce or sweet soy sauce accompanied with shallots and pickles. On the other hand, sate padang defines its own boundaries completely different with the rest of the satays.

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Firstly, when it comes to sate padang, everybody’s favorite meat part is the beef tongue because of its juiciness and texture. Not to mention that it works really well with the sauce’s characteristics. As a substitute for beef tongue, you can also ask for the offals and lean meat. All these usually come with rice cakes.

Secondly, the sauce. Sate Padang Ajo Ramon comes from the coastal town of Pariaman and the sauce style from there is usually a tad spicier with less use of turmeric, making the sauce darker and somewhat fiery. The other style came from Padang Panjang area with more use on the turmeric, thus making it yellower. The sauce itself has a thick texture and is made from rice flour, offal broth, and local spices such as galangal, ginger, garlic, cumin, and curry powder.

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We’re all lucky that nowadays we can find Sate Padang Ajo Ramon in many places in Jakarta – from the original location at Pasar Santa to Jalan Cikajang, Jalan Gunung Sahari, Kelapa Gading, or even in the comfort of air-conditioned mall like Pasaraya Grande Blok M. The stalls usually open up from 3pm, patrons quickly come in to order the delicacy which is considered highly suitable for an early dinner and as a source of energy to fight the traffic back home after the office hours.

The Foodie Magazine - Sate Padang Ajo Ramon 4 The Foodie Magazine - Sate Padang Ajo Ramon 3

The second generation family members now takes care of the business after Ajo (abang/older brother) Ramon started it since the 1980s and has grown up really fast for the past few years. The flavor suits many Jakartans although some say that if it’s the real stuff you’re looking for then one should head to Pariaman instead. Yes, that becomes our homework together foodies!

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SATE PADANG AJO RAMON
Halal-friendly
Unsuitable for vegetarians

Address: Jalan Cipaku I – Pasar Santa and several other outlets around Jakarta
Tel: +62.813.1433.4666

Opening hours: Everyday, 3 pm – finish

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE February 2014 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photos by: Dennie Benedict

Confessions of a Foodie: Ade Putri Paramadita – Miss Hot Rod Queen (The Foodie Magazine, Feb 2014)

A multitalented girl with an extreme infatuation towards food? Let us meet Ade Putri Paramadita, or known in the digital world as @missHOTRODqueen!

The Foodie Magazine - Miss Hot Rod Queen

Initially, I got to know Ade Putri Paramadita from her reputation as a radio presenter, having her own show about food. It’s a whole different perspective aside from TV, online, or print media because you basically can’t see the food. Her job to visualize it to her listeners made her a great storyteller. It’s hard to avoid hearing my stomach growl after listening Ade talk about food.

When I met her in person, Ade apparently is this cool, slim girl with tattoos and piercings that made me swear that she looks more like a rockstar than a foodie! Well, in her spare time, she’s actually a road manager for a well-known indie rock band in Indonesia. But behind all these, she gets excited when it comes to food.

Although working daily for a digital agency as a producer, she always spends her time wandering around many places with the food-lover community of Aku Cinta Makanan Indonesia (ACMI) under the guidance of William Wongso. Alongside ACMI, Ade often goes out to scour traditional markets, participates in cooking classes, and as the organizer potluck events with other members.

“My fascinations with Indonesian food are endless. You’ll always have a story behind every dish because of the complexity. When I was a kid, I learned about so many ingredients from A-Z but in the end, they’re all used for a single dish only!’, Ade said with eyes brimming with excitements. One of these days, she helps the catering business owned by her mother and as a buzzer to help promote her mother’s warung in Cipete that oftentimes closed after only three hours of lunch rampage. Cooking becomes something that’s so inherent in her family.

‘My favorites came from Balinese and Minahasan cuisines. From Bali, it’s any kind of lawar because I love how it tastes, and from Manado – the outrageous heat from any kind of woku dishes’, she admitted. ‘Balinese cuisine is just fantastic and even my friends called me Ade Bulung because I’m so in love with rujak bulung. As for my personal indulgence, take me out for good Bataknese babi arsik and the smoky se’i babi from Kupang!’

When I found out more, turns out that Ade has her own romantic way of enjoying good time with her lover no matter what the food is. ‘For me, a romantic date is to try someplace new whatever the food is. If it’s good then we’re gonna share the good news with everyone, but if it’s bad we’ll just laugh and enjoy our time together’, she said.

I then asked her about one example of her bad experiences. ‘Well, one time I ordered this pasta with feta cheese and spinach back in an Italian warung when in Bali. When it comes, I can only find greasy pasta with only basils, no sign of feta and spinach at all! Me and him, we just laughed’, she said widely smiling.

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Visit Ade’s Twitter and Instagram at: @missHOTRODqueen

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Food dictionary:

Rujak Bulung
Seaweed rujak with fried soybeans, shredded coconuts, poured with mackerel broth.

Lawar
Balinese mixed vegetables dish with herbs, spices and coconut. Usually accompanied with meat.

Woku
Seafood dish with extensive use of spices, often making up half the dish. The ingredients consist of turmeric, ginger, lime leaves, chili peppers, lemongrass, and others.

Se’i Babi
Smoked pork, Eastern Nusa Tenggara-style.

Babi Arsik
Pork cooked using Indonesian usual spices and Bataknese specials like andaliman (Indonesian Sichuan pepper) and torch ginger with turmeric and chilis, making the dish yellow in color.

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Featured in THE FOODIE MAGAZINE February 2014 edition

Download it for free here via SCOOP!

Photos by: Dennie Benedict